process

HOPE, Pt. 2 - Progress: Why The Little Things Are The Big Things

“The man who moves a mountain begins by carrying away small stones.”
— Confucius

“The most important shot in golf is the next one.” — Ben Hogan

From Belief To Action

The first part of this mini-series on hope was all about the foundational hope of knowing we are never finished in life — or stated affirmatively: we are always in-process. Which means, our current place in life is more descriptive than it is definitive. It means that growth is possible, whether or not it looks like the picture of growth we imagined.

In this second installment of the mini-series, my goal is to discuss what our focus in that process should be — how we can leverage hope to our advantage and add fuel to fan the flame of that hope to higher and higher realms.

If knowing that growth is always possible is the first step to living a hope-filled life, then the second step is to believe that hope and take steps forward to prove that belief.

HOPE, Pt. 1 - In-Process: A Catalyst for Hope

“Life shrinks or expands in proportion to ones courage."  — Anais Nin

“The good life is a process, not a state of being. It is a direction not a destination.” — Carl Rogers

Benjamin Franklin is said to have coined the infamous saying about the only two things that are guaranteed in life: ____ & ____. 

Unless you’ve been living underground, I’m fairly certain you passed the quiz with flying colors. 1) Death and 2) Taxes seem to be the only guarantees we have in life. 

Of course there can always be other arguments that are made. If you do a simple google search for “guarantees in life,” you will find endless articles on various opinions of what should be inserted in addition to death and taxes, but the original deduction by Franklin carries with it the right balance of brevity and truth that makes it a fair analysis of the human condition.

Part of the truth that this cliche conveys is that life is filled with movement, dynamism, and change. 

Perspectives, Pt. 3 - Destination < Journey

Perspectives is a series about just that - perspectives: how we view the world; how we process the information and events we experience in everyday life.

In order to self-correct we must first be self-aware enough to know what needs correcting. Self-awareness entails an objective view of how we personally think and operate, which leads to a greater empathy and understanding towards others with whom our views and perspectives differ.

The heart behind this series is to examine the power of perspective through blog posts, to help illustrate and open our eyes to the power perspective can bring. At some point, your perspective and mine will undoubtedly differ... and that’s the point. This is my take on it, what’s yours?

The Question

Here’s the question: what’s more important? The journey? Or the destination?

I would guess that most of us would agree that the journey is the probable answer, but do our lives and our actions really back up that belief? My guess is: that’s hardly the case.

Hope vs. Expectation: A Finer Line Than You Might Think

Recently, I read a verse that caused me to stop in my tracks and ponder.

Here's the verse: 

"The hope of the righteous brings joy, but the expectation of the wicked will perish."  - Proverbs 10:28

This is a seemingly straight-forward verse, but I would argue it's depths are quite profound. Within the verse, the two qualifiers for each statement are: "righteous" and "wicked". This is indicating those who are believers in Jesus Christ (the only way we are seen as righteous), and unbelievers. But, beyond this distinction, there is universal wisdom that can be drawn out of this concise portion of Scripture - regardless of your beliefs or worldview.

The Far Side of Complexity

“Simplicity is the final achievement. After one has played a vast quantity of notes and more notes, it is simplicity that emerges as the crowning reward of art.” ~ Frederic Chopin

What is true mastery?  And how does one achieve it?  It is safe to say these questions have been asked and pursued for as long as competitive sports or competitive careers have been around.  Countless books have been written on this topic, each giving their own take on what this "formula" might be.  Now it's my turn.